he writer gives topic according to the dataset used The writer gives topic according to the dataset used

Coursework Assignment #3

The WORD LIMIT is 2,750 words.

 

Write a research project proposal (up to 2,750 words) based on or inspired by a dataset from the broad environmental sciences (hydrology, atmosphere, terrestrial, ocean, etc.) and initial analyses that you perform on those data.

 

Note the following items (not necessarily to appear in this order, nor will the different items be the ‘same’ number

of words):

 

(a) Find EITHER an environmental data set for at least one variable that changes through time (minimum

400 values per variable) OR an environmental data set for several variables such that the total number of data values is at least 400 (with minimum 4 variables and minimum 20 records per variable; e.g. a data matrix of 8 variables each with 25 records = 400 data values). As part of your research project proposal background you will need to briefly describe your dataset, including reference to appropriate background literature and data limitations, and using plots of the data. Do not use the same dataset that you used in any previous assignments. Examples of some excellent sources of environmental data are: CDIAC (2015), CEH (2015), Dryad (2015), ECN (2015), KCL (2015), LTER (2015), NBN (2015), NCDC (2015), NGDC (2015), USGS (2015).

 

(b) Further explore your data as part of your research project proposal introduction and background.

Include discussing, performing and presenting graphically at least TWO kinds of analyses on/with these data sets (e.g. correlation/regression analyses, time-series analyses). Include any preliminary conclusions reached

based on your analyses and any appropriate background literature. This does NOT need to be extensive, but should be concise and to the point, with some solid and relevant analyses done. Include figures, and refer to these with your conclusions. Note that any visual presentation of your data in for descriptive purposes in (a)

above does not count as one of your analyses.

 

(c) Produce a short research project proposal based on the exploration of your data. In the proposal explain what you would do if you had the time and money, based on or inspired by your chosen dataset, with a budget

<£2k and time period <3 months, to address a question/hypothesis of your choosing—be creative! The time

period should be one continuous period of time (make sure you include time to write up your research). Include your proposed ‘question/hypothesis’, detailed justification of your budget, your timetable, [NOTE: The timetable must also include GANTT CHART]

research methods (and their strengths and weaknesses) applicable to your project, any ethics issues, any risk issues, and a thorough literature search. Do not include your own time in your budget (consider this to be ‘free’), but do consider the time/cost of others that may be hired to help you, travel expenses to the field, any items

like insurance, extra baggage if necessary, equipment hire, consumables, etc. If you want to use equipment from the College, then include it as a line item, but put the cost as £0; be sure the equipment is available for student use. If you are doing lab analyses (e.g., heavy-metals) then ensure that any lab materials, which can be expensive, are costed out.

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

The following specific requirements apply (over and above the official Coursework Submission Requirements):

&nbsp;

(i)   FIGURES and TABLES. Use a MINIMUM of 4 and a MAXIMUM of 10 figures and/or tables. Note that one figure can have multiple parts to it (use peer-reviewed journals as examples, labelling each part A, B, C,

…, with ONE figure caption for the entire figure). Ensure that your tables are appropriate (e.g., putting a 2,000 word risk assessment into a table that goes over six pages is inappropriate).

(ii) TITLE, ABSTRACT, KEYWORDS. In addition to a TITLE of 80 characters or less, include an

ABSTRACT of 100 words or less and up to six KEY WORDS (these are included in your 2,750 word limit). The abstract should include the heading Abstract and the key words should follow the abstract on a separate line, with the heading Keywords. The abstract summarizes your coursework, including the main points AND conclusions, and should contain no references. You might spend a bit of time researching how to write a

‘good’ abstract.

(iii) REFERENCES. Your coursework should include 15 or more references from peer-reviewed journal articles (and will most likely include many more than 15).

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

Remember to follow the guidelines for proper formatting of the coursework and as indicated in the ‘Basic Skills’ material you received at the start of term. These will aid you to make your coursework look MUCH more professional in terms of tables, figures, etc.

&nbsp;

NOTE: Please use at least 20 references for this paper

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

References Cited

CDIAC (2015) Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. [Online] Available at: http://cdiac.ornl.gov/ [Accessed 13

September 2015]. Includes extensive databases related to CO2.

CEH (2015) The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (Data Holdings) [Online] Available at: http://www.ceh.ac.uk/data/index.html [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Includes large set of data holdings hosted by CEH on ecology and hydrology in the UK.

Dryad (2015) The Dryad Digital Repository [Online] Available at: http://datadryad.org/ [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Freely re-useable data files associated with published article from across the sciences and medicine.

ECN (2015) The Environmental Change Network Data Centre [Online] Available at: http://data.ecn.ac.uk/ [Accessed 13

September 2015]. Manages data for five UK integrated environmental monitoring networks.

KCL (2015) The London Air Quality Network. [Online]. Available at: http://www.londonair.org.uk/london/asp/default.asp [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Access to wide range of pollutant measurements, by specific London area, for (in some cases) back to 1993, and depending on measurement, with 15’ resolution. See ‘Download Data’.

LTER (2015) The US Long Term Ecological Research Network Data Portal. [Online] Available at: http://portal.lternet.edu

[Accessed 13 September 2015]. Contains over 6000 metadata entries for ecological datasets contributed by 27 past and present LTER sites.

NBN (2015) National Biodiversity Network Gateway [Online] Available at: https://data.nbn.org.uk/ [Accessed 13 September

2015]. Data gateway for NBN UK biodiversity data (>100 million species records)

NCDC (2015) USA National Climatic Data Center, Climate Data Online. [Online]. Available at: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/ [Accessed 13 September 2015]. World’s largest archive of weather data. If you have problems downloading any of this data, you may need to use a geography master’s room computer, as these IP addresses should be ‘recognized’ as academic ones.

NGDC (2015) USA National Geophysical Data Center Home Page. [Online]. Available at: http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/ [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Links to large amounts of data, including palaeodata, pertinent to physical geographers.

USGS (United States Geological Survey) (2015) USGS Water Resources. [Online] Available at: http://water.usgs.gov/ [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Extensive selection of water related data.

Coursework Assignment #3

The WORD LIMIT is 2,750 words.

&nbsp;

Write a research project proposal (up to 2,750 words) based on or inspired by a dataset from the broad environmental sciences (hydrology, atmosphere, terrestrial, ocean, etc.) and initial analyses that you perform on those data.

&nbsp;

Note the following items (not necessarily to appear in this order, nor will the different items be the ‘same’ number

of words):

&nbsp;

(a) Find EITHER an environmental data set for at least one variable that changes through time (minimum

400 values per variable) OR an environmental data set for several variables such that the total number of data values is at least 400 (with minimum 4 variables and minimum 20 records per variable; e.g. a data matrix of 8 variables each with 25 records = 400 data values). As part of your research project proposal background you will need to briefly describe your dataset, including reference to appropriate background literature and data limitations, and using plots of the data. Do not use the same dataset that you used in any previous assignments. Examples of some excellent sources of environmental data are: CDIAC (2015), CEH (2015), Dryad (2015), ECN (2015), KCL (2015), LTER (2015), NBN (2015), NCDC (2015), NGDC (2015), USGS (2015).

&nbsp;

(b) Further explore your data as part of your research project proposal introduction and background.

Include discussing, performing and presenting graphically at least TWO kinds of analyses on/with these data sets (e.g. correlation/regression analyses, time-series analyses). Include any preliminary conclusions reached

based on your analyses and any appropriate background literature. This does NOT need to be extensive, but should be concise and to the point, with some solid and relevant analyses done. Include figures, and refer to these with your conclusions. Note that any visual presentation of your data in for descriptive purposes in (a)

above does not count as one of your analyses.

&nbsp;

(c) Produce a short research project proposal based on the exploration of your data. In the proposal explain what you would do if you had the time and money, based on or inspired by your chosen dataset, with a budget

<£2k and time period <3 months, to address a question/hypothesis of your choosing—be creative! The time

period should be one continuous period of time (make sure you include time to write up your research). Include your proposed ‘question/hypothesis’, detailed justification of your budget, your timetable, [NOTE: The timetable must also include GANTT CHART]

research methods (and their strengths and weaknesses) applicable to your project, any ethics issues, any risk issues, and a thorough literature search. Do not include your own time in your budget (consider this to be ‘free’), but do consider the time/cost of others that may be hired to help you, travel expenses to the field, any items

like insurance, extra baggage if necessary, equipment hire, consumables, etc. If you want to use equipment from the College, then include it as a line item, but put the cost as £0; be sure the equipment is available for student use. If you are doing lab analyses (e.g., heavy-metals) then ensure that any lab materials, which can be expensive, are costed out.

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

The following specific requirements apply (over and above the official Coursework Submission Requirements):

&nbsp;

(i)   FIGURES and TABLES. Use a MINIMUM of 4 and a MAXIMUM of 10 figures and/or tables. Note that one figure can have multiple parts to it (use peer-reviewed journals as examples, labelling each part A, B, C,

…, with ONE figure caption for the entire figure). Ensure that your tables are appropriate (e.g., putting a 2,000 word risk assessment into a table that goes over six pages is inappropriate).

(ii) TITLE, ABSTRACT, KEYWORDS. In addition to a TITLE of 80 characters or less, include an

ABSTRACT of 100 words or less and up to six KEY WORDS (these are included in your 2,750 word limit). The abstract should include the heading Abstract and the key words should follow the abstract on a separate line, with the heading Keywords. The abstract summarizes your coursework, including the main points AND conclusions, and should contain no references. You might spend a bit of time researching how to write a

‘good’ abstract.

(iii) REFERENCES. Your coursework should include 15 or more references from peer-reviewed journal articles (and will most likely include many more than 15).

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

Remember to follow the guidelines for proper formatting of the coursework and as indicated in the ‘Basic Skills’ material you received at the start of term. These will aid you to make your coursework look MUCH more professional in terms of tables, figures, etc.

&nbsp;

NOTE: Please use at least 20 references for this paper

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

References Cited

CDIAC (2015) Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. [Online] Available at: http://cdiac.ornl.gov/ [Accessed 13

September 2015]. Includes extensive databases related to CO2.

CEH (2015) The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (Data Holdings) [Online] Available at: http://www.ceh.ac.uk/data/index.html [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Includes large set of data holdings hosted by CEH on ecology and hydrology in the UK.

Dryad (2015) The Dryad Digital Repository [Online] Available at: http://datadryad.org/ [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Freely re-useable data files associated with published article from across the sciences and medicine.

ECN (2015) The Environmental Change Network Data Centre [Online] Available at: http://data.ecn.ac.uk/ [Accessed 13

September 2015]. Manages data for five UK integrated environmental monitoring networks.

KCL (2015) The London Air Quality Network. [Online]. Available at: http://www.londonair.org.uk/london/asp/default.asp [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Access to wide range of pollutant measurements, by specific London area, for (in some cases) back to 1993, and depending on measurement, with 15’ resolution. See ‘Download Data’.

LTER (2015) The US Long Term Ecological Research Network Data Portal. [Online] Available at: http://portal.lternet.edu

[Accessed 13 September 2015]. Contains over 6000 metadata entries for ecological datasets contributed by 27 past and present LTER sites.

NBN (2015) National Biodiversity Network Gateway [Online] Available at: https://data.nbn.org.uk/ [Accessed 13 September

2015]. Data gateway for NBN UK biodiversity data (>100 million species records)

NCDC (2015) USA National Climatic Data Center, Climate Data Online. [Online]. Available at: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/ [Accessed 13 September 2015]. World’s largest archive of weather data. If you have problems downloading any of this data, you may need to use a geography master’s room computer, as these IP addresses should be ‘recognized’ as academic ones.

NGDC (2015) USA National Geophysical Data Center Home Page. [Online]. Available at: http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/ [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Links to large amounts of data, including palaeodata, pertinent to physical geographers.

USGS (United States Geological Survey) (2015) USGS Water Resources. [Online] Available at: http://water.usgs.gov/ [Accessed 13 September 2015]. Extensive selection of water related data.

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