A sociological review of children in their social context: A critical examination of childhood reflecting on contemporary issues. Do children have an active role within society?

A sociological review of children in their social context: A critical examination of childhood reflecting on contemporary issues. Do children have an active role within society?

Order Description

A sociological review of children in their social context: A critical examination of childhood reflecting on contemporary issues. Do children have an active role within society?
This review will look at the childhood from a sociological perspective. It will need to reflect upon the emergence of the sociology of childhood and the impact of political agendas and policies, in regards to the child as an active participant within society. Do policies mirror practice? Does political agenda affect how the role of a child is viewed?
At least one contemporary issue covered within Term 2, should be examined from the perspective of the child. A focus on the child’s voice and role, is required here. REMEMBER: Avoid biased discussion, there are always multiple approaches to any discussion. Think back to term one when we covered issues on race, class, gender, socialization theories etc.
A MINIMUM of 12-15 References are required for this essay. (A different chapter from the same book, does not count)! Be resourceful with your research, the social sciences all work in collaborative harmony; this is a sociology module, but go wild and look at Philosophical, Psychological and Economical texts too. Reading widely around your subject will give more depth and critical engagement to your writing.
Most importantly, this is an opportunity to exercise your own academic authority, and your own academic voice. Avoid too many or long direct quotations, we want to read your own academic discussion around these contemporary and hard hitting topics. (Whilst maintaining third person context within your discussion).
Your tutors will be happy to review essay plans only.

ED4010
Children in their Social Context

Part 3: LO:
60% Weighting
Word Count: 3000 (+/- 10%)
This essay should be written in an academic format; third person ONLY.  Due on Wednesday, 6th May 2015 @ 3PM
A sociological review of children in their social context: A critical examination of childhood reflecting on contemporary issues.  Do children have an active role within society?
This review will look at the childhood from a sociological perspective.  It will need to reflect upon the emergence of the sociology of childhood and the impact of political agendas and policies, in regards to the child as an active participant within society.  Do policies mirror practice? Does political agenda affect how the role of a child is viewed?
Write about the history of early childhood studies
At least one contemporary issue covered within Term 2, should be examined from the perspective of the child.  A focus on the child’s voice and role, is required here.  REMEMBER: Avoid biased discussion, there are always multiple approaches to any discussion.  Think back to term one when we covered issues on race, class, gender, socialization theories etc.
A MINIMUM of 12-15 References are required for this essay.  (A different chapter from the same book, does not count)!  Be resourceful with your research, the social sciences all work in collaborative harmony; this is a sociology module, but go wild and look at Philosophical, Psychological and Economical texts too.  Reading widely around your subject will give more depth and critical engagement to your writing.
Most importantly, this is an opportunity to exercise your own academic authority, and your own academic voice.  Avoid too many or long direct quotations, we want to read your own academic discussion around these contemporary and hard hitting topics.  (Whilst maintaining third person context within your discussion).
Include UNCRC, children rights,
Do children have a voice in the society.
Contemporary issues:  ‘childhood’ in ‘crisis’,  domestic violence,  child abuse or family in crisis (Choose from one of them Contemporary issues
The values of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and how it can be used to reflect upon issues of power between children and adults and within local, national and international contexts

Your tutors will be happy to review essay plans only.
Module Title:

Children in Their Social Contexts     Module Code: ED4010

Level: 4

Credit: 30

ECTS credit: 15
Module Leader: Katie Weller

Pre-requisite: None                                     Pre-cursor: None

Co-requisite: None                     Excluded combinations: None

Location of delivery:  UEL / Online / Other external partners

Main aim(s) of the module:

•   To introduce students to a range of sociological, conceptual and theoretical tools for analyzing the social contexts in which children live and grow.
•   To examine different theoretical frameworks of childhood and their implications for attitudes to children, the status of children, how they are studied and their relevance for the ways in which we intervene in children’s lives
•   To examine the ways in which childhood is socially constructed and experienced in a variety of national and international social contexts from the perspectives of both children and adults

Main topics of study:

•    Sociological perspectives of childhood, parenthood and family
•    Childhood in historical perspective
•    Children’s rights
•    Socio-cultural models of primary and secondary socialization
•    The influence of social class, gender, ethnicity and (dis)ability on the experience of childhood
•    Children’s friendships and peer cultures
•    Contemporary issues and debates about childhood and family
•    The role of the state and other institutions (e.g. family, media) in the construction of childhood
•    Contemporary issues and debates in relation to childhood and family e.g. the notion of ‘family’
and ‘childhood’ in ‘crisis’; domestic violence; child abuse
•   The values of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and how it can be used to reflect upon issues of power between children and adults and within local, national and international contexts

Learning Outcomes for the module

At the end of this module, students will be able to:

Knowledge
1.    Discuss sociological perspectives of childhood, parenthood and family
2.    Draw on insights from sociology to explain the experience of childhood

Thinking skills
3.    Discuss the influence of sociological and children’s rights theory on practice in the early years
4.    Review international law (UNCRC) and key institutions that define and impact on children’s lives, rights and relationships

Subject-based practical skills
5.    Demonstrate sound academic skills in formative and summative assessments
Skills for life and work (general skills)
6.    Draw on a variety of sources (personal, news media, research studies and other academic literature) to discuss the experience of childhood
Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes:

For on campus students:
Lectures, seminars, tutorials, project supervision, demonstrations, practical classes and workshops, fieldwork, external visits, work based learning (not placement) formative assessment tasks

If online delivery:
Engagement with tutor prepared material through VLE: Discussion forums / blogs and text chat sessions / online presentations / Moodle workshops / directed reading and reflection / collaborative and research activities / formative assessment tasks

Self directed activities including: Assignment preparation / background reading / on-line activities / group work / portfolio / diary preparation / directed reading / self-formed study groups / discussion with other students online

Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the module; please define as necessary:

Portfolio     Weighting:

100%

(5000 words or equivalent)    Learning Outcomes demonstrated:

1-6
Reading and resources for the module:

Core
Brooks, L. (2006) The story of childhood: growing up in modern Britain. London: Bloomsbury Publishing.
Chambers, D. (2012) A sociology of family life: change and diversity in intimate relations. Cambridge: Polity Press.
Corsaro, W. (2011) The sociology of childhood. 3rd edn. London: Sage.
Jones, P., Moss, D., Tomlinson, P. and Welch, S. (eds.) (2008) Childhood: services and provision for children. Harlow: Pearson Education.
McDowell Clark, R. (2013) Childhood in society for the early years. 2nd edn. London: Sage/Learning Matters.
Wyness, M. (2012) Childhood and society.  2nd edn. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Recommended
Cunningham, H. (2006) The invention of childhood. London: BBC Books.
Frost, N. (2011) Rethinking children and families: the relationship between childhood, families and the state. London: Continuum.
James, A. and James, A. (2012) Key concepts in childhood studies. 2nd edn. London: Sage.
James, A. and Prout, A. (eds.) (1997) Constructing and reconstructing childhood: contemporary issues in the sociological study of childhood.  London: Falmer Press.
Jones, P. (2009) Rethinking childhood: attitudes in contemporary society. London: Continuum.
Jones, P. and Walker, G. (eds.) (2011) Children’s rights in practice. London: Sage.
James, A., Jenks, C. and Prout, A. (1998) Theorizing childhood.  Cambridge: Polity Press.
Lareau, A. (2011) Unequal childhoods: race and family life. 2nd edn. California: California University Press.
Penn, H. (2005) Unequal childhoods: young children’s lives in poor countries. Abingdon: Routledge.

Journals
Children & Society
Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood
Journal of Child and Family Studies
Sociology
Pedagogy, Culture and Society
International Journal of Children’s Rights

Internet Sites
Children and Young People Now www.cypnow.org.uk
Children’s Rights Alliance www.crae.org.uk
Children’s Society www.childrenssociety.org.uk
Family and Parenting Institute http://www.familyandparenting.org
Joseph Rowntree Foundation  www.jrf.org.uk
Office for National Statistics www.statistics.gov.uk
The Economic and Social Research Council www.esrc.ac.uk
UNICEF www.unicef.org

Indicative learning and teaching time
(10 hrs per credit):    Activity
1. Student/tutor interaction:

On campus delivery:
Lectures, seminars, tutorials, project supervision, demonstrations, practical classes and workshops, supervised time in studio/workshop, fieldwork, external visits, work based learning (not placements), formative assessment tasks

Online delivery:
Engagement with tutor prepared material through VLE: Discussion forums / blogs and text chat sessions / online presentations / Moodle workshops / directed reading and reflection / collaborative activities / formative assessment tasks

Dedicated support staff and academic tutors will be available through the Online student community and will address all queries in line with our student charter for distance learning

Student / tutor Interaction = 72 Hours
(24 x 3 hour weekly session)

2. Student learning time:
On campus delivery:
Seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary preparation /  VLE activities / directed reading / self-formed study groups / discussion with other students / child observations

Online delivery:
Assignment preparation / background reading / on-line activities / group work / portfolio / diary preparation / directed reading / self-formed study groups / discussion with other students online
Student learning time = 228 hours

Total hours
(1 and 2):
300 hours

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